Title page for ETD etd-03232004-093027


Type of Document Master's Thesis
Author May, Mary C
Author's Email Address mmay1@lsu.edu
URN etd-03232004-093027
Title The Relationship among Alcohol Consumption, Dietary Intake, and Body Mass Index in Young Adults
Degree Master of Science (M.S.)
Department Human Ecology
Advisory Committee
Advisor Name Title
Carol E. O'Neil Committee Chair
Mary E. 'Betsy' Garrison Committee Member
Pamela Monroe Committee Member
Keywords
  • alcohol consumption
  • body mass index
  • macronutrients
  • energy
Date of Defense 2004-02-09
Availability unrestricted
Abstract
This study was designed to assess the relationship of alcohol consumption, dietary intake, and body mass index (BMI) in 1,335 young adult males and females aged 20-38 years (62% female and 27% black) who were part of the Bogalusa Heart Study. Data were collected in 1995-1996 on dietary intake and alcohol consumption patterns.

The prevalence of alcohol consumption was higher in males compared with females and higher in whites than blacks. Among drinkers, whites and blacks did not differ in the amount of alcohol consumed. Energy from alcohol was also greater in males than in females.

Total energy intake did not differ between drinkers and non-drinkers. Across levels of alcohol consumption, total energy intake was not significantly different among non-drinkers, light drinkers, or moderate drinkers; however, heavy drinkers consumed significantly more total energy than did non-drinkers, light, and moderate drinkers.

Drinkers did not differ from non-drinkers in relation to non-alcohol energy intake. Intake of non-alcohol energy remained constant across levels of alcohol consumption.

Carbohydrate intake (g) was significantly lower in drinkers compared with non-drinkers. Carbohydrate intake was significantly lower in moderate and heavy drinkers compared with lower levels of alcohol consumption.

Mean energy intake from protein (g) did not differ between drinkers and non-drinkers. Protein intake was significantly lower in heavy drinkers compared with lower levels of alcohol consumption.

Total fat intake (g) was significantly lower in drinkers compared with non-drinkers. Total fat intake was significantly lower in heavy drinkers compared with lower levels of alcohol consumption.

Adjusted means for BMI and waist circumference were greater drinkers than for non-drinkers. Mean BMI did not differ between males and females; however, waist circumference was greater in males than in females.

Energy from alcohol was added to the diets of drinkers, particularly heavy drinkers. Paradoxically, drinkers had a lower BMI and a smaller waist circumference than did non-drinkers.

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